Temporary labor, especially blue-collar labor, has become a very injury-prone sector of the job market. Due to harsh economic times, many employers have hired temporary workers rather than full-time employees. This is especially true in jobs that require manual labor. For example, workplace settings would include industrial manufacturing facilities, warehouses and construction sites. These workplace injuries often stem from situations in which workers are given little to no training.

Such was the case of a young man on his first day of the first job that he ever held. He was a temp worker at a Bacardi plant, and he was eager to begin making money and taking on responsibility. He took the precautions required of him, set out to buy the specific steel-toe boots, and arrived early for a quick orientation. How could he or his proud family ever expect that the young, motivated man would never return from his first day of work?

He texted a picture of himself in his work attire to his fiancée while in the bathroom and promised to call her on break. He never did. Due to safety precautions not being executed by another worker the young man was crushed under a platform weighing approximately 2,000 pounds.

Unfortunately, many employers lack compelling motivation to change their operations because they are not usually required to pay medical bills for the temporary worker. If a worker is hired full-time, the employer is responsible for medical treatment when there is an accident on the job. However, if a temp worker is hired, a company will often attempt to shift the blame to the temp agency.

Although facts from this study have been taken from all-around the country, New York residents should take heed. New Yorkers who are injured on the job and seek workers’ compensation must navigate a maze of rules and regulations just like anyone else. The good news is that no one has to undertake this task alone. An experienced attorney can lend a helping hand and assist people in getting the best result possible from a tragic and sometimes life-altering situation such as an accident on the job.

Source: Pacific Standard, “Temporary Work, Lasting Harm,” Michael Grabell, Olga Pierce and Jeff Larson, Feb. 3, 2014