Angiuli & Gentile, LLP
347-201-4447
Schedule A Case Review Today

Is your work giving you an occupational illness?

When you think of workplace illnesses, the image that jumps to mind is probably one of a factory worker breathing in noxious fumes day in and day out, or a construction worker who's made to lift heavy machinery over and over again. But occupational illnesses take all sorts of forms and pop up anywhere, from coffee shops to the cubicle.

So, what can you do to help circumvent these type of injuries?

  • Make sure you are exercising regularly throughout the week. Doing so will strengthen muscles and help reduce stress.
  • Change up the tasks that are repetitive if you can. Try to vary your work flow to allow for breaks from sustained similar motions.
  • Your body is a great barometer. Listen to it. If you are feeling aches and pains or mental stress, take a moment to stretch and get away from the task.
  • Posture is important. Make sure you are sitting properly at all times and never slouch over your computer.

While some might argue that these types of injuries are just unavoidable side effects, any activity that is causing pain or inducing in jury should not be part of the job. If it is, employees may be entitled to workers' compensation to cover the medical expenses and long-term effects that the injury may have caused.

If you are experiencing pain as a part of your daily duties at work or have been injured on the job, you may want to speak with a New York attorney, especially if you've been denied workers' compensation or have had no assistive measures taken to alleviate any physical hardship. He or she can listen to your case and advise you on the best course of action to help you secure a favorable outcome.

Source: clickorlando.com, "Preventing back pain, injury at work," June 2, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Email Us For A Response

Get the Answers You Need

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Private consultations are now available. Review Us